Hidden Figures: A Story That Needed To Be Told

Hidden Figures: A Story That Needed To Be Told

 Michelle at the Hidden Figures Private Screening in Washington, DC

Michelle at the Hidden Figures Private Screening in Washington, DC

I had the honor of attending a special screening of the film Hidden Figures last night at the Regal Cinema Theater in D.C.'s Chinatown.  It's the true story of 3 African American female engineers and mathematicians that each, in their own remarkable way carved their own place in history. 

As this film is set to premier in theaters nationwide on January 6th, I won't spoil the details. What I gathered from this film was more pride than I ever thought imaginable. Pride in the story of Katherine Johnson who bravely walked into rooms where she wasn't welcomed or respected because of her race and sex yet managed to prove every single one of those "haters" wrong through her brawn and brilliance. Pride in the story of Dorothy Vaughn who persevered and thought outside the box in the pursuit of the advancement of not just herself but of those around her as well. Pride in the story of Mary Jackson who didn't sit around and complain about her circumstance, but instead used every bit of energy and brains she had to overcome her obstacles and the obstacles faced by so many. Pride in the telling of a story that was largely unheard of in a way that was graceful yet strong, heroic yet relatable. Pride in knowing some of the backstory and the nuts and bolts it took to tell this story: from the musical contribution to the actors, the advisers and the archival footage which all seemingly meld together with an almost serendipitous ease.

That was the underscore: the genius of it all. Albert Einstein once said "Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by Its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that It is stupid." So I am thankful that this story was told. It shows that genius should never be stifled because it could, in fact, change the world. To the geniuses behind this true story and to the geniuses with the talent to portray this story for we audience members: thank you.

I am thankful to have seen this film: with its glimpse into race relations of the early 1960's, it was vital that they succeed in showing the good and the bad sides what it meant to live in a segregated society. So many times you could hear the gasps of astonishment through of the film m, with the collective "that couldn't be me's" of the predominantly African American crowd. The highs and lows of the film felt a little much at times, but I reminded myself that these attempts at eliciting a visceral reaction wasn't for me or someone that looks like me at all: it was for those that never had their intelligence questioned simply due to their skin color

I hope this is a box office smash and wins all the awards, and not just because black women and space geeks (which can come in the same package - I am proud to be one of them) see this movie. It's Disney-esque quality makes it an incredible feature film for every human being of any age. Inspiring and uplifting, from the true story to the incredible placement of the music, Hidden Figures has, and will, set in motion a new generation of dreamers and achievers. Let's just pray that all of our future geniuses--in whatever capacity their genius comes in--has someone that not only points out their genius, but identifies, it nurtures it, and allow it to soar like a NASA rocket ship.  

Here's is the official trailer for Hidden Figures. Are you going to see it? Were you a space geek like me? Leave me a comment!